A Light in the Attic

After all I had to take a work light up into the attic so I could see to install the recycled/reused insulation from the deconstruction to increase the R-value in the small attic over the back bedroom and bath.

The original insulation was blown in fiberglass. I was told it was fiberglass, I thought some other kind of cellulose was used and this stuff was not as prickly as the batts. You can see the boards that I put over the top so that I could crawl around without falling through the ceiling.

Blown in Insulation

Blown in Insulation

The insulation was about 6″ deep up there for an R value of about 24.

Blown in at Eaves

Blown in at Eaves

Although difficult to see in the photo, there is a continuous plastic vapor/air barrier on the warm side of the attic floor.

Plastic vapor barrier

Plastic vapor barrier on warm side installed before the drywall

Also the eaves were sealed with caulk and in some cases spray foam–the attic is not vented at the eaves.

Sealed at the eaves

Sealed at the eaves

I added two layers of fiberglass batt pushed back into the eaves over the walls and laid perpendicular to each other.

Layers of Fiberglass batt

Layers of Fiberglass batt

We still had more batts to use up so I laid some three deep around the front wall and piled them up in front of the only interior wall.

Interior wall Insulation

Interior wall Insulation

Final R-Value? Probably around R-66. (two layers of 5 1/2 inch plus the original 6.) A good amount for an attic.

Two layers of batts

Two layers of batts

The job was hot and prickly. I coated myself with baby powder, wore a 3M mask, a tyvek coverall and gloves and still felt prickly afterwards. A good hot shower immediately afterward helped though.

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