Family Room Bathroom Vanity Sink

It is a granite sink on a heavy and thick granite slab. I originally had the sink sitting on the logs of the vanity stand but with the addition of the slab I needed to figure out how to hold up the sink for the drain connections. I noticed sink rings as a plumbing supply for basin sinks that apparently do this, but a small ring would not work with a large rectangular sink. So I ordered a stainless steel tray in a brass color to set the sink upon.

I cut a hole in the tray and it lets the sink sit up about 3/4″ above the granite.

Tray Cut Out

Tray To Cut Out

Tray Mount

Tray Mount

I did not run across instructions to secure the sink to the vanity top after using a ring so I used a ring clamp on a rubber sleeve to keep the sink from lifting from the surface of the countertop.

Clamp to secure sink

Clamp to secure sink

With the sink installed I needed a box to mount the wall faucet. I saw the idea of building a box on another website. It was a bit difficult to figure out where to mount the faucet valve inside the box. I put in two cross pieces and then chose the lower one with the pipe about even with the valve. I realized that made the font too close to the sink. So I moved the valve up and changed the outlet pipe straight across from the faucet mixing pipe.

Three walls and a cover

Three walls and a cover

Then I used the hand sander to sand all the surfaces with four different grid sandpapers. I applied two coats of Waterlox and let them dry and the box was fitted behind the sink.

Sanding and Waterlox

Sanding and Waterlox


I want to use pine logs as trim in the house and I started with this box. The faucet is mounted at the right height over the sink. The valve is a little too low because it does not clear the sink rim but it can be shut off in either the hot or cold positions so I’m leaving it for now.

Box behind sink

Wall faucet mounted in box behind sink

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Another Leak Fixed

The Victorian style sink I’m using in the master bathroom was in the shed when my daugher and her husband bought their new house. There were a pair of them. I told her I wanted them and they said sure. Even after storing outdoors for three years, I cleaned off the old caulk and the sink is in great condition. With the powder coated metal vanity, it is a Victorian/Industrial style. Eclectic!

Victorian sink

Victorian sink

The bathroom sink faucet was purchased from eBay and either it was missing parts or I lost them. I didn’t have the below sink tightener and I had to improvise, although it is not tight enough and I ordered a Toto sink version that looks like the original and I should be able to tighten it completely.

I used an old bent up chrome supply trim and cut it to fit around the pipes with my Dremel tool and drilled a hole for the threaded rod. In order to get the fastener below the tight pipes, I used a section of drain pipe.

Improvised faucet fastener

Improvised faucet fastener

The supply pipes are so close to the threaded rod that holds the faucet that while I was tightening the bolt, I was loosening the copper pipe. It was just enough to have it start leaking. Unfortunately, I thought the leak was at the shark bite connector. So after lots of hemming and hawing around at the hardware store, I brought home a compression fitting that I didn’t end up needing. But the discovery of the leak meant I had to take the whole faucet out to tighten the pipes to the faucet.

Source of the leak

Source of the leak

The copper pipes have a threaded end and a small gasket to keep them from leaking. It is kind of nice because they could be replaced if they become too damaged. If I could find the parts. So the faucet leak was fixed and the faucet put back into place.

Faucet in place

Faucet in place

I also removed the toilet AGAIN. Although the foam gasket allowed me to install and remove it several times, it also worried me that the flange was over a part of the drain area. If waste was restricted there it would be a mess to take care of later so I decided to cut a portion of the flange away to allow for a more open waste area.

Cut opening in toilet ring flange

Cut opening in toilet ring flange

Then one more time, I had to align the toilet over the bolts just right to set it. I fiddled with the bolts two or three times before I got it right. I also noticed that the bolts I used are kind of short and really are meant to be broken off. So there is a stripped area on the bolts that was keeping me from tightening the toilet. I struggled with that for awhile until I realized washers would move the nut up enough to use the normal threads. Sometimes it takes awhile to really see a problem that is occurring.

Final toilet install

Final toilet install

So these two pieces are now ready for my sister’s visit this week! I wanted them done for visitors in late August but DIY often takes a longer time than planned.

Two piece bath ensemble

Two piece bath ensemble

And thinking to figure out what I could use for storage underneath I checked out craigslist and found a brown former medical cart that I liked and took a ride over today to buy it. It just feels good to add this touch.

Storage cart under sink cabinet

Storage cart under sink cabinet

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